Monthly Archives: July 2011

Chief Black Dog – The Builder


Chief Black Dog with Wife

Chief Black Dog-II with Wife

Although there have been many Osage Chiefs over the history of the people, I will probably continue to return to Chief Black Dog and his band of Osage, as he was paramount to the local history in this area where Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma meet.

Black Dog was a huge man, even by today’s standards. He stood 7 feet tall and was well over 300 pounds by all accounts. I will not attempt to go into a personal history of the Chief at this time. Native American history can be confusing at best. Each person may have been known by several names, for instance, an ‘honor name’ which is something to be earned in battle or hunting. (War and hunting were practically the same for their purposes). Besides having multiple names, there are generations carrying the same name. At this time I am speaking of Black Dog I and his accomplishments in primitive civil engineering. There are 3 main feats to mention.

THE BLACK DOG TRAIL:
Although Black Dog’s Band lived in Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma, the Black Dog Trail extended across southern Kansas.  It went from Baxter Springs to Cedar Vale, to Hooser, up to Dexter, to Silver Creek, near Winfield and across to the Arkansas River north of Oxford. An 1895 map supports this account and today’s US highway 166 runs on the same route in many places. This major trail also had many alternate routes, as do all of the ancient Osage trails. The main trail was completely cleared of rocks and plants. One account says that in most places the trail was “eight horses wide”. Black Dog I is correctly credited with creating the very first improved roads in both Kansas and Oklahoma.
THE CLAREMORE RACETRACK:
 Black Dog’s band were sometimes mistaken for Cheif Claremore’s band. One large Black Dog camp was at Claremore’s village, the present Claremore Oklahoma. The Black Dog camp was actually located at the site of today’s Woodlawn Cemetery at Claremore. Black Dog was notoriously shy of whites, and authority of any kind. As such, accounts of this racecourse are rare. Please mention any accounts you may find!
THE CLAREMORE CAVE:
 At Claremore (Oklahoma), Black Dog had constructed a completely concealed cave. It was not just a place for a Chief to hide, but was built large enough to hold the almost 500 members of his band, along with an entire year’s supply of food. This cave proved to be the Black Dog Band’s saviour.
 In 1817, a group of white men, along with bands of Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Comanche, Delaware, Kowasati and Tonkawa fell upon the Claremore village. The village was empty of all the able warriors, who were on a buffalo hunt at the time. They subsequently killed or captured all of the Osage they found. This became known as the ‘Battle of Claremore mound.” None of Black Dog’s people were harmed, as any that were present hid out in the cave, but their empty village was looted and burned.
 In all fairness, I must mention at this point, that this Osage band was not innocent themselves. It was Scouts from this band that led a raid by Custer’s soldiers on a helpless village at the Washita river. The same scene is now immortalized in the movie “Little Big Man”.
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Diamond Head / Phil Manzanera


MUSIC somehow touches the soul. That is so true for me. There are so many feelings and moods that can’t be expressed with words. I can’t explain the feeling this song gives me, and you probably get something different. I have no idea why this video goes with this song, but I love the song. ~sekanblogger

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Too Many Rulings are Supremely Courteous to Corporations


The Walmart case is only one example of the Supreme Court’s growing tendency to side with the interests of big corporations over the rights of ordinary citizens.

Marge BakerBy Marge Baker

Americans realize that our rights and liberties depend on having a system of justice that we can trust. We know we should be able to show up in court to contest anything from a parking ticket to felony and make our case — whether we’re rich or poor.

But there’s one U.S. court where it’s increasingly hard for individual Americans to have their voices heard. The Supreme Court — our court of last resort — is making it harder for individual citizens to hold the rich and powerful accountable.

In recent years, the high court has consistently twisted the law and Constitution to put giant corporations’ profits over the rights of individual Americans. That means it’s getting harder for citizens to seek justice when corporations stiff us.

In June, for instance, the Supreme Court ruled that more than a million women who had suffered wage discrimination as employees of Walmart couldn’t join together to sue the company. Several women had filed a class action suit against the company on behalf of themselves and up to 1.5 million other women who faced similar treatment, seeking to pool their resources in order to go up against one of the most powerful corporations in the world. But the majority opinion ignored what the women had in common and focused instead on the differences bound to arise within a group that large, ruling that they couldn’t go in it together to hold Walmart accountable. By sharply reducing the ability of employees to pool their resources, the court has made it easier for big employers to discriminate.

The Walmart case is only one example of the Supreme Court’s growing tendency to side with the interests of big corporations over the rights of ordinary citizens. Earlier this year, the court ruled that Californians who had fallen prey to an alleged scam by their cell phone company couldn’t join together to hold the company accountable. Because each customer was cheated out of a relatively small amount, few customers would go to the trouble of recovering their money. Many victims had not even noticed the relevant charge in their bill.

For these reasons, only a large class action lawsuit would serve to hold the company accountable. In another case, the court ruled that a financial firm accused of defrauding its investors couldn’t be held liable because the firm had protected itself with a cleverly designed corporate structure. In doing so, the court both ignored the clear meaning of the law and essentially provided financial firms with an instruction manual on how to defraud their clients without being caught.

In the past year, the Supreme Court also handed two big victories to pharmaceutical companies. In one, it ruled that a state couldn’t prohibit the sale or use of pharmacies’ prescription data by drug companies without the prescribing doctor’s authorization. In the other, the court let a pharmaceutical company off the hook for failing to warn about the dangerous side effects of a drug it was selling — a failure that resulted in at least one patient developing a painful and incurable neurological disorder.

Of course, sometimes the law really is on the side of big business. Our justice system requires that big corporations get a fair hearing just as ordinary citizens do. But they don’t deserve more of a voice than the rest of us. The Supreme Court, guided by a right-wing majority, has increasingly bought the convoluted arguments of moneyed corporations lock, stock, and barrel, while turning a blind eye to the law — to say nothing of the impact on ordinary Americans. These decisions don’t just hurt the individuals directly involved in them. They hurt us all, by limiting our rights and sending a signal to the wealthy and powerful that they can go ahead and abuse the rest of us without consequence.

Our founders wrote the Constitution to protect individuals against the whims of the powerful. But too often lately, the Supreme Court has twisted our laws to protect the powerful from being held accountable by individuals. Supreme Court justices and lower federal court judges must defend the Constitution, not twist it beyond recognition.

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The War On Cameras


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Raise The Debt Ceiling Rap


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Budgeting for Ignorance


The most shameful assault in state legislatures these days is on our public schools.

Jim Hightower By Jim Hightower

 Will Rogers said that when Congress is in session, the public gets the same panicky feeling as  “when the baby gets hold of a hammer.”

 Rogers’ observation can also be applied to the mayhem that has broken out in various smash-  happy state legislatures. All across the country, right-wing zealots are wielding their little  ideological hammers to destroy common sense and wreck the common good. These anti-  government extremists are going after everything from the basic rights of workers to our crucial environmental protections.

Their most shameful assault, however, is on our public schools. They’re not merely clobbering teachers and shattering education budgets; they’re after the very idea of public education. A few years ago, Debbie Riddle, a boneheaded Texas legislator, asked: “Where did this idea come from that everybody deserves free education?” The Republican then sputtered, “It comes from Moscow, from Russia. It comes straight out of the pit of hell.”

She was hooted down then, but this year, her Kafkaesque ideological extremism has moved from the legislative fringe to the center of the Republican majority’s agenda. Using the huge budget deficit (which they created) as their excuse, Texas GOP lawmakers and the Republican governor are cavalierly slashing our state’s historic, constitutional commitment to providing an “efficient system of public free schools.”

Even as student enrollment is growing exponentially, these ideologues are whacking the state’s school budget by $4 billion. Worse, they are terminating the law that gives our public schools top budgetary priority, based on how much we need to spend to educate our children. No more “entitlement,” they scream, as stupidly as they can.

Unfortunately, Texas is not the only state putting budgetary ideology over school kids and undermining our entire society’s future. As the old bumper sticker puts it: “If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.”

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If I Were A Rich Man


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How Dim Is Billy Long? (via The Erstwhile Conservative: A Blog of Repentance)


How Dim Is Billy Long? Whatever you may have thought of the late Amy Winehouse or her music, surely we can all agree that Congressman Ozark Billy's willingness to use the English singer's sad death to make a stupid political point is going too far, even for a Tea Party Republican:   Here is how London's Daily Mail reported this embarrassing episode: A Republican congressman has faced a furious backlash after he compared the U.S. debt ceiling crisis to the tragic demise … Read More

via The Erstwhile Conservative: A Blog of Repentance

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Fanfare For The Common Man by Copeland


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The Pot Republic


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